Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

46 Merchant St
Honolulu, HI, 96813
United States

808-536-4441

Past Seasons


44TH SEASON (2014  2015)


ECHOES OF DAT RED GUITAR


BY LEE TONoUCHI

MAy 28 – June 28, 2015


“SO…HOW’S IT FEEL TO BE OFFICIALLY ONE STATE WORKER?” 

Hawai‘i’s “Pidgin Guerilla” returns to Kumu’s stage with a darkly humorous play about a bright but unmotivated man still living at home with his parents who berate him for his lack of ambition. He gets a job in a state office populated with memorable characters, including a bully, nerdy techies, a born-again Christian sex bomb, and a haole boss who stresses “community” and “teamwork.”

When impending state furloughs threaten his employment, will he be able to summon his personal `aumakua, the Japanese superhero Kikaida? Or will the pressure drive him to go postal?

This production includes adult themes, sexuality and violence, and may not be suitable for more sensitive viewers.


SHOW DATES:

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
May 28, 29, 30
June 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 2015

Sundays 2pm:
May 31
June 7, 14, 21, 28*, 2015


*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request

Tickets can be purchased with a credit card by calling 536-4441, at KumuKahua.org, or by visiting our box office at 46 Merchant Street (corner of Bethel & Merchant Streets, downtown) between 11am and 3pm Monday through Friday. Ticket prices range from $5 to $20.


KA'IULANI


A HISTORICAL DRAMA REVIVAL BY DENNIS CARROLL, VICTORIA KNEUBUHL, ROBERT NELSON AND RYAN PAGE

MARCH 26 – APRIL 26, 2015

A poetic rendering of the short life of Hawai'i's half-Hawaiian, half-Scottish princess.


THE BELLS OF THE CITY PEALED A JOYOUS WELCOME TO THE NEW HEIR TO THE HAWAIIAN THRONE 

Within the short life of Princess Kaiulani is contained the sad, shameful story of the downfall of the Hawaiian Kingdom. She was sent to Europe to receive an education befitting her royalty, but during her absence the monarchy was abrogated and she returned to Hawaii a figurehead rather than a queen. Kaiulani is a historical-musical-psychological drama complete with a Greek/Hawaiian chorus and a Hawaiian chanter. The play, which portrays the princess during three different phases of her life, originally premiered at Kumu in 1987.


SHOW DATES:

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: March 26, 27, 28; April 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 2015

Sundays 2pm: March 29; April 12, 19, 26*, 2015


*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request

(No show Sunday, April 5 – Easter)

Tickets can be purchased with a credit card by calling 536-4441, at KumuKahua.org, or by visiting our box office at 46 Merchant Street (corner of Bethel & Merchant Streets, downtown) between 11am and 3pm Monday through Friday. Ticket prices range from $5 to $20.



MY NAME IS GARY COOPER


A HAWAI’I PREMIERE EARLY HOLLYWOOD DRAMA BY VICTOR RODGER

JANUARY 22 – FEBRUARY 22, 2015

A young Samoan man visits a Los Angeles family to deal with some unsettled issues.


gary.jpg

“HE LEFT ONE NIGHT FULL OF LOVE AND KISSES BUT I NEVER SEE THAT BASTARD AGAIN.” 

Rodger, a playwright of Samoan ancestry, deals with themes of race, racism and identity. In My Name is Gary Cooper, he combines knowledge of classic Hollywood films about the South Pacific with a determination to bring Pacific Island characters to the foreground. He says, “[In] Hollywood’s…South Pacific films…white characters entered the brown world and stirred things up. What if, I wondered, a brown character entered the white world instead, and stirred things up? What would it look like?” This play answers the question.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: January 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31; February 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 2015

Sundays 2pm: January 25; February 8, 15, 22*, 2015

*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request

(No show Sunday, February 1 – Super Bowl)




A WORLD PREMIERE NOIR MYSTERY DRAMA BY SUSAN SOON HE STANTON

NOVEMBER 6 – DECEMBER 7, 2014

When a young man disappears under mysterious circumstances, his estranged brother tries to find him.


I HAVEN’T SEEN MY BROTHER IN YEARS. I THINK HE MIGHT BE ANGRY WITH ME. I OWE HIM. IF HE’S ASKING FOR HELP, THEN HE NEEDS IT. 

In this noir mystery drama, a man returns to Hawaii after ten years, responding to an urgent summons from his brother. On arrival he learns that his brother is missing, and that many things have changed since their childhood. To uncover the mysteries, the brother encounters a girlfriend, a homeless man who may have witnessed something relevant, a crime boss and an enigmatic young private investigator. Identities shift and the past re-emerges as the search seems to reveal more questions than answers.


SHOW DATES:

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: November 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 28, 29, 30; December 4, 5, 6, 2014

Sundays 2pm: November 9, 16, 23, 30; December 7*, 2014


*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request

(No show Thursday, November 27 – Thanksgiving)

Tickets can be purchased with a credit card by calling 536-4441, at KumuKahua.org, or by visiting our box office at 46 Merchant Street (corner of Bethel & Merchant Streets, downtown) between 11am and 3pm Monday through Friday. Ticket prices range from $5 to $20.

Due to the intricate nature of this script, late seating will not be allowed.  Please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to showtime.




A WORLD PREMIERE COMEDY BY SCOT IZUKA

AUGUST 21 – SEPTEMBER 21, 2014

Peer pressure and identity issues create comedy and drama in a private Hawai'i high school.


SHE NEVER GOIN’ UNDERSTAND LOCAL STYLE ‘CAUSE SHE WASN’T RAISED IN HAWAI’I 

In the mid-1980s, boys attending a Catholic all-boys high school deal with their use of pidgin English when a substitute teacher from Kansas takes over their classroom. Meanwhile, the substitute struggles to learn local ways in both the classroom and the home of her Japanese-American fiancé’s parents. And a student from a private girl’s school faces the scorn of the boys due to rumors about her reputation.


“I love what playwright Izuka wrote in his author’s note in the program: ‘Don’t think too hard about it. Just enjoy the show.’  You will do both: think and enjoy.”

–Wanda Adams, Theatre Critic for The Honolulu Star-Advertiser  (read the review)

SHOW DATES: SOLD OUT!

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: November 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 28, 29, 30; December 4, 5, 6, 2014

Sundays 2pm: November 9, 16, 23, 30; December 7*, 2014



43rd Season (2013 2014)


Koi, Like the Fish


An Oʻahu premiere by Keali‘iwahine Hokoana

May 29 – June 29, 2014


After I’m gone, this house will be yours. 

A young woman, her husband and child move in to her ailing uncle’s house to take care of him. But Koi, used to living alone, soon begins to clash with his new housemates in spite of their assistance. Tensions rise, and soon Koi’s only real friend turns out to be the woman who delivers the mail.

Originally produced on Maui in 2008, this timeless family drama takes an unflinchingly realistic look at the problems of families living together.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
May 29, 30, 31
June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28

Sundays 2pm:
June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29*

*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request



Cockadoodledoo


A world premiere by Eric Yokomori

March 27 – April 27, 2014


Last night that comet made contact with the earth. She struck our atmosphere and exploded into thousands of pieces. And down came the meteors. 

In a small rural town where “nothing interesting happens,” a chunk of meteor lands in farmer Templeton’s chicken coop and changes everything – including the chickens. His friend Ziggy, to whom he sells a souvenir chunk, undergoes a bizarre transformation and is quarantined by the Feds.

But this is only part of Yokomori’s surrealistic tale, which echoes Beckett’s Waiting for Godot and Ionesco’s Rhinoceros. Expect the unexpected when life turns extraordinary.


"Yokomori's Cockadoodledoo is a masterpiece of absurd surrealism" - Will Caron, INHonolulu

“The audience was in stitches”Hester Lewellen of Hitting the Stage

SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
March 27, 28, 29
April 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26

Sundays 2pm:
March 30
April 6, 13, 27*

*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request

(No show Sunday, April 20 – Easter)



MOA A MŌʻĪ, CHICKEN INTO KING


Popular Hawaiian legends of Umi retold by Jean Charlot, with permission from © The Jean Charlot Estate LLC.

January 23 – February 23, 2014


Let no one see you first who is not the king. Otherwise, you will die. 

Born in France, Jean Charlot (1898-1979) emigrated to Mexico where he became a renowned muralist. In 1949 he moved to Hawaii as a teacher and artist in residence at UH Manoa. Drawing upon his environment and local culture for inspiration, he continued to create hundreds of artworks, as well as Two Hawaiian Plays (1976). This one, Moa a Mōʻī (“Chicken Into King”), recreates several stories about ʻUmi, who was born a commoner and became a wise and famous ruler.

SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
January 23, 24, 25, 30, 31
February 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22

Sundays 2pm:
January 26
February 9, 16, 23*

*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request

(No show Sunday, February 2 – Superbowl)



Flowers of Hawai‘i


Back by Popular Demand, a world premiere by Lee Cataluna

November 7 – December 8, 2013

Ten vignettes capture the essence of family relationships. Heart-tugging family dramedy.


  The cast of fifteen includes Jacob Song, Charlotte Dias, Danielle Zalopany, Jaime Bradner, Jason Quine, Julia LoPresti, Karen Hironaga, Kati Kuroda, Lisa Ann Katagiri Bright, Nick Nakama, Reb Allen, Tiffany Brown, Tyler Tanabe, Wil Kahele, and Wil Hao.

 

The cast of fifteen includes Jacob Song, Charlotte Dias, Danielle Zalopany, Jaime Bradner, Jason Quine, Julia LoPresti, Karen Hironaga, Kati Kuroda, Lisa Ann Katagiri Bright, Nick Nakama, Reb Allen, Tiffany Brown, Tyler Tanabe, Wil Kahele, and Wil Hao.

"We understand what it’s like to raise kids who turn out nothing like we intended. 

Ten vignettes capture the essence of family relationships. Kumu audience favorite Lee Cataluna returns to our stage with a series of short playlets depicting the strained and often confrontational relationships among members of several Hawaii families.

An elderly woman’s children and grandchildren claim her possessions while she’s still alive, sticking name tags under her belongings. A young mother tries to foist off the responsibilities of raising her child onto her mother. A married woman grows tired of her affair with a possessive policeman. And a neighbor discovers that his friend is being physically abused by his wife. Cataluna, well known for her hilarious local-style comedies, gets serious without absenting her sense of humor in this world premiere drama.


"The great actors (all 15 of them) will have you thinking, crying, laughing and wondering…is my family like this? Trust me, it probably is, which is good because the basis of the story is love.”
—Allan Okubo

Review – Midweek – Rasa Fornier

Review – Honolulu Pulse – Ryan Senaga

Read the interview with Lee Cataluna about this script

SHOW DATES

Thursdays: July 24 and 31
Fridays: July 25 and August 1
Saturdays July 26 and August 2
Sundays July 27 and August 3

Thursday, Friday and Saturday performances begin at 8:00 PM and Sunday matinees are at 2:00 PM.



WILL THE REAL CHARLIE CHAN PLEASE STAND UP?


A world premiere by Nancy P. Moss

August 22 – September 22, 2013

The fictional Charlie Chan and the real-life detective he was modeled after join forces to fight crime in Honolulu.


This humble person has come to offer his help.

Wielding his whip, detective Chang Apana is single-handedly cleaning up the gambling houses and opium dens of Honolulu’s 1920s Chinatown and Iwilei districts. But when a corrupt racist cop threatens to undo his good works and remove him from the force, Apana is assisted in uncovering crime by a stranger from San Francisco who speaks in Confucian aphorisms, many in mangled English. Playwright Moss entertains with a creative blend of historical theater, crime drama and comedy.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
August 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31
September 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 2

Sundays 2pm
August 25; September 1, 8, 15, 22*

*American Sign Language Interpretation upon request



42nd Season (2012 - 2013)


One comedy of erras


A World Premiere By Taurie Kinoshita 

August 30 – September 30, 2012

Shakespeare’s rollicking farce, local-style.


“Because you have da same blood, you tink you related. You tink dat’s wat makes you you?”

Twin brothers, separated at birth — one raised on the Mainland, the other in Hawai‘i — accidentally cross paths in downtown Honolulu. As their friends mistake one for the other, the slapstick and insults fly, and chaos ensues. The result is a true comedy of errors, a Shakespearean romp told with a pidgin flair.

In the tradition of Twelf Nite o WATEVA! comes Taurie Kinoshita’s deft and dizzying farce about all the pilikia of local life.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
August 30, 31; September 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 2012

Sundays 2pm
September 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012

*American Sign Language interpretation available upon request



FISHING FOR WIVES


A World Premiere By Edward Sakamoto

November 8 – December 9, 2012

Comic confusion over a picture-bride mix-up.


“She comes here to marry a poor fisherman with no future. Something fishy here.”

It’s 1913 and two Big Island fishermen realize they have women problems. Lonely and bored with catching fish, Nishi sends for a picture bride from Japan, but sneaks a photo of his handsome friend Aoki in his place. The bride arrives and falls in love — with the wrong man — setting off a comic battle of the sexes.

Our most prolific playwright and the author of It’s All Relative and Aloha Las Vegas, Edward Sakamoto finds laughter and warmth in this loving portrait of historic Hawai‘i.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
November 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 23, 24, 29, 30; December 1, 6, 7, 8, 2012

Sundays 2pm
November 11, 18, 25; December 2, 9, 2012

*American Sign Language interpretation available upon request



A Cage of fireflies


A WORLD PREMIERE BY DANIEL AKIYAMa

January 24 - February 24

A piercing kitchen-sink drama.


“When I was little I used to think to myself, ‘That’s what the human heart looks like.’”

Three elderly sisters of the kibei generation — sent as children to be raised in Okinawa, then returned to live and work in Hawai‘i — are at the heart of Daniel Akiyama’s new play.

Two of the sisters confine themselves to their small Honolulu apartment, enacting the rituals of daily life as they cling to a dream of returning to Okinawa. The third, charged with running the family’s orchid nursery, has inherited a title that is not hers. As long-hidden hopes and regrets surface, the sisters discover what is both selfish and selfless in their love for each other.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
January 24, 25, 26, 31; February 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 2013

Sundays 2pm:
January 27; February 10, 17, 24, 2013

EXTENSION DATE
Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm, February 28-March 2
Sunday 2pm, March 3

*American Sign Language interpretation available upon request


all that remains


A World Premiere, conceived by Traci Mariano and Mona Z. Smith

Written by Mona Z. Smith

Directed by Traci Mariano

April 4 - march 30, 2013

A ghostly World War II epic.


“We are at the very beginning of our warrior play, our military drama, our soldier’s story: the lies, the hatred, the betrayal.”

In this sweeping epic of World War II, the ghosts of 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442d Regimental Combat Team soldiers return. Telling a story of loyalty and betrayal, courage and cowardice, they re-create an act of violence that torments both the living and the dead.

Using an experimental style drawing from Japanese Noh theatre, Mona Z. Smith’s All That Remains offers a challenging, provocative look at the heroism and despair of war.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
March 28, 29, 30; April 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 2013

Sundays 2pm
April 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013

(no show on March 31st – Easter Sunday)

*American Sign Language interpretation available upon request.



Sound & Beauty


Two one-act plays by david henry hwang

May 30 – June 30, 2013

Two haunting dramas about dark attractions.


"This HOUSE — my loneliness is etched into its walls.”

The dark corners of human attraction are explored in David Henry Hwang’s Sound and Beauty, two one-act plays performed together in a full evening of theatre. In “The Sound of a Voice,” a samurai encounters a mysterious woman in a lonely cottage, and begins to suspect her powers are not of this world. In “The House of Sleeping Beauties,” a modern-day writer seeks out an exclusive brothel where the girls all share a haunting trait.

First performed off-Broadway in 1983, Sound and Beauty reveals the strange and lyrical world of David Henry Hwang, the Tony Award-winning author of M. Butterfly and Chinglish. 


"Sound and Beauty is a touching evening of theatre worth taking in." – Troy Apostol of Hitting the Stage 

"Another brilliantly acted, spellbinding show that leaves you thinking … and thinking … and thinking." - Rasa Fornier of Midweek 

"Kinoshita’s direction creates a beautiful balance between text and image…" - Yining Lin of Hitting the Stage

“'Sound and Beauty' looks and sounds, well, like a sort of melancholy beautiful." - Ryan Senaga of The Star Advertiser 

 "What do we crave from theatre? All of the above, and this production delivers."  - Eleanor Svaton of Hitting the Stage 

SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
May 30, 31
June 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29, 2013

Sundays 2pm
June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013

*American Sign Language interpretation available upon request



41st SEASON (2011 - 2012)


Cane Fields Burning 


A World Premiere by Kemuel DeMoville

September 8 - October 9, 2011


“Something’s stirring in the shadows. Something’s coming. Something’s waiting.”

Ghosts, demons, and dark memories haunt Hawai‘i’s plantation fields in this tale of a curse passed down through the generations. An old man has died; as his son and grandson sort through his belongings, the photograph of a beautiful woman exposes the violent secret buried in the old man’s past.

The winner of the Kumu Kahua/UH Manoa Playwriting Contest, Cane Fields Burning uses the elegant power of Japanese Noh theatre to tell the story of a family struggling to escape its tortured history.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
September 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 29, 30; October 1, 6, 7, 8, 2011

Sundays 2pm
September 11, 18, 25; October 2, 9, 2011



A Jivebomber’s Christmas 


A Kumu Kahua Premiere by Saachiko and Dom Magwili

November 10 - December 11, 2011


“Want people together, right? Want community spirit? Then we gotta throw a roo-too-toolioo-do Christmas dance with all the trimmings!”

It’s Christmas, 1943, but nobody feels like celebrating. The world is at war and the soldiers of the 442nd Battalion are fighting in Europe, while at home, Japanese Americans are being illegally detained in internment camps. A group of kids, raised on jazz and jive, social clubs and swing dancing, decides to raise the camp’s spirits--with a Christmas show.

Filled with song and dance, laughter and warmth, A Jivebomber’s Christmas arrives at Kumu Kahua just in time for the holidays.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm 
November 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26; December 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 2011

Sundays 2pm
November 13, 20, 27; December 4, 11, 2011

(No show Thursday, November 24, because of Thanksgiving)



Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre


A World Premiere by Lois-Ann Yamanaka

Adapted by John H.Y. Wat and Harry Wong, III

January 26 - February 26, 2012


“I tell you something. No tell nobody, okay?”

The unforgettable poetry of Lois-Ann Yamanaka unfolds in this new theatrical adaptation. Meet Tita, Girlie, Lucy, Kala, and other young women on the brink of adulthood, as they explore sexual awakening, family abuse, peer pressure, and identity. With humor, pain, and raw honesty, their voices come to life on Kumu Kahua’s intimate stage.

The winner of the Pushcart Prize, Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre was Lois-Ann Yamanaka’s first major work and introduced the world to one of Hawai‘i’s bravest writers.

This play contains strong language.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
January 26, 27, 28; February 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 2012

Sundays 2pm
January 29; February 12, 19, *26, 2012

(No show Sunday, February 5, because of the Superbowl)



Wilcox’s Shot 


A World Premiere by Sean T.C. O’Malley

Mar 29 - Apr 29, 2012


“Let them remember a Hawaiian Patriot, not a Rebel. I fought for one cause and one cause only my entire life: the Hawaiian cause.”

1901: Robert Kalanihiapo Wilcox, the revolutionary-turned-politician, arrives in Washington as Hawai‘i’s first delegate to Congress. A man of action in a powerless position, Wilcox confronts some of the most famous names of the era as he grapples with his own role in shaping Hawai‘i’s future.

Wilcox’s Shot dramatizes the life of one of our most fascinating historical figures, at the dawn of the 20th century.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
March 29, 30, 31; April 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28, 2012

Sundays 2pm
April 1, 15, 22, *29, 2012

(No show Sunday, April 8, because of Easter)



Kamau A‘e


A Kumu Kahua Revival by Alani Apio

May 31 - July 1, 2012


Kamau a‘e — you carry forward that which needs to be remembered. One thing Hawaiians get: we know what is pono.”

The Hawaiian Sovereignty movement, with its complexities and controversies, takes the stage in this powerful drama. Fresh out of prison, Michael Kawaipono Mahekona joins a group of activists on a mission to reclaim Hawaiian land. As the group splinters over whether to stand firm or compromise on its principles, Michael must decide how to stay true to what he believes.

First produced in 1997, Kamau A‘e returns to Kumu Kahua, sharing its message with a new generation of audiences.

This play contains strong language.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm 
May 31; June 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30, 2012

Sundays 2pm
June 3, 10, 17, 24; July 1, 2012



4oth SEASON (2010 - 2011)


Ghosts in the Plague Year


By Dennis Carroll

based on a story by Dennis Carroll and Bob Okazako

August 26 - September 26, 2010


Chinatown, 1900: In a seedy brothel, men from all walks of life gather to enjoy opium, drinks and the company of women. Outside, the bubonic plague has begun to spread, and the government will do anything to stop it. Dennis Carroll, a founding member of Kumu Kahua and the author of Way of a God and Age Sex Location, unleashes a brutal and sensual new play that brings to life a dark chapter in Hawai‘i’s history. This play contains adult language and content.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
August 26, 27, 28; September 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 2010

Sundays 2pm
August 29, September 5, 12, 19, *26, 2010

*American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



The Great Kaua‘i Train Robbery


A Kumu Kahua commission by Lee Cataluna

October 28 - November 27, 2010


Kaua‘i, 1920: At a time when plantations used railways to transport workers’ pay, the stage was set for one of Hawai‘i’s most unusual robberies. This is the story of Hali, a man who will do anything to protect his beloved family—even if it means becoming a suspect in the crime. From the author of the smash hits Folks You Meet in Longs and Da Mayahcomes this tender and moving drama, inspired by a true story, about how far we go for the people we love.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
October 28, 29, 30; November 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 26, 27, 2010

Sundays 2pm
October 31; November 7, 14, 21, *28, 2010

(No Show Thursday, November 25th, because of Thanksgiving).

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



Da Kine Space


A Kumu Kahua commission by Lee A. Tonouchi

January 13 - February 13, 2011


Gen X and Gen Y collide, local style! Meet Ry, a failed artist frustrated by his life and relationships, and Cader, a wannabe filmmaker with some odd ideas about art. As Ry and Cader confront the creative process, pop culture, the generation gap and more, the theatre transforms into a living art gallery. Lee A. Tonouchi, the author ofLiving Pidgin and Gone Feeshing, brings his sharply-honed pidgin and offbeat sense of humor to this wry study of art and life in contemporary Hawai‘i. This play contains adult language and content.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
 January 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29; February 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 2011

Sundays 2pm
 January 16, 23, 30; February *13, 2011

(No Show February 6th, because of the Suberbowl).

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



The Holiday of Rain


A Kumu Kahua commission by Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl

March 24 - April 23, 2011


At the Sadie Thompson Inn in Samoa, guests can take part in an unusual experience: a reenactment of W. Somerset Maugham’s 1921 short story “Rain.” But thanks to a magician’s time warp, the real Maugham finds himself on the guest list. Swirling together fantasy, history, humor and drama, Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl, winner of the Hawai‘i Award for Literature and the author of The Conversion of Ka‘ahumanuand Ola N? Iwi, deconstructs one of the world’s most popular writers.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm 
March 24, 25, 26, 31; April 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 2011

 

Sundays 2pm
March 27; April 3, 10, *17, 2011

(No Show April 24th, because of Easter)

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request 



It’s All Relative


By Edward Sakamoto

May 26 - June 25, 2011


The Miyamotos look like a happy family, but in Edward Sakamoto’s dark comedy, nothing is what it seems. Beneath the surface you’ll find a collapsing marriage, resentment, regret, midlife crises, and three daughters who’ll do anything for their parents’ attention. One of our most popular playwrights and the author of Aloha Las Vegas and Stew Rice unveils a fresh, funny and challenging portrait of a local family adrift in the modern world.


show dates

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm
May 26, 27, 28; June 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 2011

Sundays 2pm
May 29; June 5, 12, 19, *26, 2011

* American Sign Language Performance



39TH SEASON (2009 - 2010)


THE STATEHOOD PROJECT


CONCEIVED BY FAT ULU PRODUCTIONS & KUMU KAHUA THEATRE

AUGUST 21 - SEPTEMBER 20, 2009


In conjunction with Fat Ulu Productions, an organization dedicated to creating and strengthening communities through the literary arts (it recently produced a series of collaborative poetry performances), Kumu Kahua presents a collection of monologues, scenes and stories written by Hawaii playwrights, poets and storytellers. With the intention of presenting multiple perspectives on the issue of statehood in Hawaii – including political, historical and sociological – in early 2009 Kumu and Fat Ulu invited local writers to create short, personal expressions and reflections on any chosen aspect of statehood. These pieces were first read by the writers or actors to an audience, then revised by the writers and refined and organized by producers at Kumu. The result is a significant, and refreshingly different addition to both the commercial promotion and journalistic reportage that has been celebrating Hawaii's 50th anniversary of statehood.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: August 21, 22, 27, 28, 29
September 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 2009

Sundays 2pm:
August 23, 30
September 6, 13, *20 , 2009

(Opening Friday, August 21, 2009 Statehood Day)

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



Voices from Okinawa


by Jon Shirota

November 5 - December 12, 2009


Originally produced last year by the East West Players in Los Angeles, Voices From Okinawa tells the story of Kama Hutchins, an American of Okinawan ancestry who teaches English to local Okinawans. He eschews traditional ESL teaching methods to have his students relate personal stories to the class. As the tales are told, the young students reveal their attitudes toward the American soldiers stationed on the island. (For years, Okinawans have protested the U.S. presence, citing crime, rape and the destruction of Okinawan culture.) From his students, as well as from his shaman great-aunt, Kama learns a great deal about his own cultural heritage. The drama blends with comedy as Kama is compelled to defend his teaching methods to the school principal. The playwright's father left Okinawa in 1907, along with three brothers, and became a pineapple grower on Maui. The brothers eventually returned to Okinawa, but Shirota's family remained.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: November 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 27, 28
December 3, 4, 5, 11, 12, 2009

Sundays 2pm:
November 8, 15, 22, 29
December *6, 2009

(No show Thursday, November 26, because of Thanksgiving)

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request.



House Lights & Prolonged Sunlight


by Eric Yokomori

January 14 - February 14, 2010


In a one-act play (House Lights) and six short plays (under one title, Prolonged Sunlight), playwright Yokomori explores the human condition via dramatic surrealism and theater of the absurd. Intense aberrant behavior is the norm as characters confront one another in strange situations. In one of the short plays, Joey tells Crystal that he possesses a magic rock into which he has placed all of his love, and no one can take it away from him. Crystal finds her own rock, and the battle begins. In another, an author attempts to convince a children's book publisher to buy his x-rated manuscript. In another, a bizarre cocaine deal goes bad. In House Lights, Saul Peacock, an actor whose credits are merely those of a perennial extra ("It's the hardest role to play, really. You never draw attention to yourself."), is invited to dinner at the dysfunctional Roget household and gives them all a lesson in the difference between illusion and reality.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: January 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30 
February 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 2010

Sundays 2pm:
January 17, 24, 31 
February *14, 2010

(No show Sunday, February 7, because of the Superbowl)

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



Maui the Demigod


Adapted by Gary L. Balfantz with oli & hula created by Kahoa Malalis

March 18 - April 17, 2010


A narrative theatre adaptation of Steven Goldsberry's Maui the Demigod: An Epic Novel of Mythical Hawai`i, Balfantz's play was first produced by Kumu Kahua in 1991 and toured the islands in 1992. The play incorporates hula, chant and storytelling in bringing the many myths of Maui to the stage – including his miraculous birth, prank-filled childhood, and heroic deeds of manhood such as slowing down the pace of the sun and pulling an island from the depths of the sea. Characters in the play include Maui's older brothers Loke, Waena and Ki`i, his mother Hina, god of the ocean Kanaloa and the sun La. Many versions exist of the same stories because, as the Kupuna says, "Maui was a great man. There were many who said he did things that he did not do. Many liars whom we cannot blame for their wonderful lies."


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
March 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 2
April 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 2010

Sundays 2pm:
March 21, 2
April 11, *18, 2010

(No show Sunday, April 4, because of Easter)

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request

 



THE hilo massacre


by Tremayne Tamayose for the Center for Labor Education & Research, University of Hawai‘i (now at West O‘ahu) for broadcast as part of the Center’s Rice & Roses series on Hawaii Public Television

MaY 20 - jUNE 19, 2010


On August 1, 1938, to express their solidarity with striking workers in Honolulu, more than 200 Big Island men and women belonging to different labor unions (including longshoremen, warehousemen, teamsters, garbage collectors, quarry workers and the ladies auxiliary) attempted peacefully to demonstrate against the arrival of a ship from Oahu. They were met by a force of over 70 police officers who tear-gassed, hosed and fired riot guns into the crowd. Fifty of the demonstrators were hospitalized. Based in part on research from labor historian William J. Puette's book The Hilo Massacre: Hawaii's Bloody Monday, Tremaine Tamayose's teleplay, originally produced for the PBS labor history series Rice and Roses, infuses historical events with personal stories of the workers, police and politicians. It is brought to the theatrical stage for the first time by Kumu Kahua Theatre.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
May 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29
June 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 2010

Sundays 2pm:
May 23, 30
June 6, 13, *20, 2010

* American Sign Language Performance



38TH SEASON (2008 - 2009)


Da Mayah


by Lee Cataluna

August 28 - September 28, 2008


When Da Mayah debuted at Kumu in 1998, it broke box office records, drew rave reviews and inaugurated for playwright Lee Cataluna the creation of what would become a string of hit comedies. Now Da Mayah is back in all its wacky hilarity. The newly-elected mayor of Hilo, Lester Perez (campaign slogan: "Do What He Sez!"), is not too bright, but his administrative assistant, second in command and mistress Sandralene Leialoha Ferreira, manages fairly successfully to keep him from making a complete fool of himself.

When Lester is blackmailed by a childhood friend, Derek Pang, Sandy enlists the aid of her gangster cousin Dukie and his hit man Stanton, who has "a rap sheet thicker than the Bible" and a crush on Sandy. The action takes us from the mayor's office to Jazzmin’s Karaoke Bar and Washerette ("Karaoke solo $1.50, duet $4.00"), bringing to play assassination attempts, betrayals and bad plate lunches.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: August 28, 29, 30
September 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 2008

Sundays 2pm:
August 31
September 7, 14, 21, 28, 2008

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



Rolling The R’s


by R. Zamora Linmark

October 30 - November 30, 2008


Edgar Ramirez, a Kalihi teenager "who looks like a Filipino John Travolta," knows that he is gay and isn't bothered by his schoolmates' taunts. Rolling the Rs is a play set in the disco years of the '70s, when high school students hung posters of Scott Baio, Shaun Cassidy and Leif Garrett, listened to Peaches and Herb, read Sixteen and Teen Beat magazines, and struggled with their identities as defined by ethnicity, nationality and sexual orientation. Edgar and his friends Katrina and Vicente exchange words with their classmates, dance, sing and experiment with sex in a free-floating, surrealistic story punctuated by the disciplinary voice of the schoolteacher, Mrs. Takemoto, and the judgmental gossip of Philippine-born and raised friends Mrs. Kayabyab and Mrs. Arayat. A Kumu Kahua world premiere.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: October 30, 31
November 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 28, 29, 2008

Sundays 2pm:
November 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2008

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



Mainland Education


by Scot Izuka

January 8 - February 8, 2009


Cultures mix, match and clash at the University of Kansas in the early 1980s. Jerome, a second-year graduate student, is a third-generation Japanese-American from Hawai‘i. His roommate Yan is Taiwanese and still struggling comically with the English language. They meet the outgoing and assertive Cathy, born and raised in the Midwest, and her roommate Rei, a Japanese national who speaks English well but with an accent. As the four spend time together, they attempt to surmount difficulties created not only by language barriers but also by national identities and cultural mores. Jerome is self-conscious about others' interpretations of his Japanese appearance outside of Hawai‘i. He begins a relationship with Cathy but is later drawn to Rei, who is pressured by her parents about being with Jerome because, to Japanese people, he is a foreigner. As the school year progresses, the friends' mutual understanding grows, but not without difficulties. A Kumu Kahua world premiere.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: January 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31
February 5, 6, 7, 2009

Sundays 2pm:
January 11, 18, 25
February 8, 2009

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request

 



What Ever Happened to John Boy Kihano?


by Susan Soon He Stanton

March 12 - April 11, 2009


Winner of the 2006 Kumu Kahua Theatre/UHM Theatre Department contest, this Kumu Kahua world premiere deals with the mysterious disappearance of a child and the effects it has on his family. John Kihano, who likes to take his youngest son fishing, returns one day without him, offering only a vague explanation about the child going to stay on the Big Island with "Auntie Maile." The problem is, no one in the family has ever heard of Auntie Maile, whom John claims is a friend of his mother whom he hasn't seen for twenty years. He has no address or phone number for her. What really happened? Did John Boy drown? Was he kidnapped? His father remains silent, only offering assurances that he will return, without specifying when. As the days turn into weeks, the police become involved, the search continues, the mystery deepens, tensions mount, loyalties shift and the family begins to fall apart.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
March 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28
April 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11*, 2009

Sundays 2pm:
March 15, 22, 29
April 5, 2009

* American Sign Language Performance



DOUBLE BILL: Kalua`iko`olau & Waiting for a King


Kalua`iko`olau a Noh play
by Kemuel DeMoville

Waiting for a King
by Krystal Ontai

May 14 - June 14, 2009


A stylized and poetic retelling of the true story of Kalua`iko`olau, also known as Ko`olau the Leper, this play is set in Kalalau Valley on Kauai, where two travelers learn the story of how Ko`olau resisted the provisional government forces when they were sent to take him and his son to Kalaupapa on Moloka`i. Ko`olau and his wife and son escaped, but the soldiers forced the inhabitants to leave the valley forever so that no one help Ko`olau. The family lived alone in the valley until first the son, and then Ko`olau, died from their disease. A Kumu Kahua world premiere.


It is the early nineteenth century in Hawai‘i, foreigners have begun to inhabit the islands and the Hawaiian kingdom is in a state of transition which will drastically affect the future. King Kamehameha will pass the throne to his son Liholiho. Kamehameha's high priestess Kaahumanu will create for herself the new post of kuhina nui, and his nephew Kekuaokalani will become custodian of the war god Kukailimoku. As the four offer differing opinions of what the future might bring and what action should be taken, a Chorus in the present look back at the past and forward into the future, contemplating the fate of the Hawaiian people.

A Kumu Kahua world premiere.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
May 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30
June 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 2009

Sundays 2pm:
May 17, 24, 31
June 7, 14, 2009

American Sign Language Interpretation performance available upon request



37TH SEASON (2007 - 2008)


ala wai


by Bryan Hiroshi Wake

August 23 - September 22, 2007


Bertram and Ernesto are two roommates who suddenly find themselves jobless and homeless. Ernesto has a drug habit and Bertram has an irrational but intense fear of tilapia. They take up residence beside the Ala Wai Canal, where they soon become engaged in a BB gun battle with Oscar, a seventh-floor resident of a nearby apartment, bringing the police. This fast-paced pidgin comedy turns surrealistic when Bert is stung on his privates by a portuguese man-o-war and miraculously acquires the ability, via urination, to heal wounds and clean up the waters of the canal. Will Bert use his new powers benevolently, or will greed prevail?


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: August 23, 24, 25, 30, 31
September 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 2007

Sundays 2pm:
August 26
September 2, 9, 16, *23, 2007

*American Sign Language Interpretation performance



Ola Nā Iwi


by Victoria Nalani Kneubuhl

November 1 - December 2, 2007


First produced by Kumu Kahua during its 24th season (1994-'95), and written by a prolific playwright whose works have been regularly produced by Kumu Kahua and who has taught playwriting at Kumu, Ola Nā Iwi (The Bones Live) investigates the serious issues involving the treatment of indigenous human remains while simultaneously telling a story that is tender, humorous, mysterious and filled with plot twists and turns. Kneubuhl skillfully conducts a historical exploration of the pseudo-scientific and often racist motivations behind grave-robbing via a series of historical monologues presented by 19th-century professors, physicians and phrenologists. But the central story is contemporary, with the plot set in motion when a Honolulu theater group returns from an international tour with a set of Hawaiian bones "illegally" reclaimed from a German museum. Several characters appear in pursuit of the bones, for reasons which are not immediately clear, including the enigmatic Nanea, whose knowledge of Hawaiian history indicates that she may have the deepest connection and most important motivation of all.


SHOW DATES

Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: November 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 23, 24, 29, 30
December 1, 2007

Sundays 2pm:
November 4, 11, 18, 25
December *2, 2007

*American Sign Language Interpretation performance



Pele Mā


adapted by John Wat, Laurel Nakanishi, and Kennly Asato

January 10 - February 10, 2008


Pele Mā is a narrative theater adaptation based on the book Pele Mā: Legends of Pele from Kaua`i  (Bamboo Ridge Press, 2001) by Frederick Wichman. The first act is a series of stories about Pele and her companions, beginning with Pele's arrival on Kaua`i in a canoe, pursued by her angry older sister, Nāmakaokaha`i, goddess of the sea. Pele herself is a refugee from her homeland, which she has set afire. Also included in the first act are several stories about the pig demigod, Kamapua`a. The second act focuses on the famous love triangle among Pele, her sister Hi`iaka and Kaua`i chief Lohiau. Although Pele is most often associated with the Big Island, these stories remind us that the Pele legends have a strong link to the island of Kaua`i. Pele Mā was originally performed at Mid-Pacific School of the Arts. It also toured as part of the American High School Theatre Festival to the annual Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: January 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 31
February 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 2008

Sundays 2pm:
January 13, 20, 27
February *10, 2008

*American Sign Language Interpretation performance



The Romance of Magno Rubio


by Lonnie Carter

March 13 - April 13, 2008


Kumu Kahua presents the Hawai`i premiere of an award-winning play based on a short story by Carlos Bulosan, a migrant worker in the Depression-era California canneries who became a respected writer and activist. Magno Rubiowas originally produced by the Ma-Yi Theater Company of New York. Set in a bunkhouse for migrant Filipino farm workers, the play tells the story of Magno Rubio, an idealist and dreamer who is both admired and taunted by his fellow workers. Nick, the resident intellectual, narrates Magno's long-distance courtship (via letters) of Clarabelle, an Arkansas woman he meets via a lonely hearts magazine. He sends her jewelry and money. Has Magno Rubio found true love? How do we define happiness or measure love? The play poses these questions while also dealing with the larger political issues of stoop labor and racism. Parts of Magno Rubio are written in rhyming verse and set to music.

Kati Kuroda will direct the production, with set design by Elizabeth Harwood, lighting design by Abel Coelho, costume design by Dusty Behner, sound design by Stu Hirayama, and Lynne Nohara is the stage manager. The cast features Kumu veterans Troy Apostol, Lito Capina, Cheyne Gallarde , MJ Gonzalvo, and Kumu newcomer Wayland Quintero.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: March 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 27, 28, 29; April 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 2008

Sundays 2pm: March 16, 30; April 6, *13, 2008

*American Sign Language Interpretation performance



Hostage Wife


by Nancy Moss

May 15 - June 15, 2008


A Kumu Kahua world premiere, Hostage Wife is an award-winning play which has received a reading in New York. It tells the story of Dee Fernandez, a woman whose husband works as a private-sector security guard watching over a power station in Iraq. When her husband is taken hostage, Dee is visited by Alan Baker, a government agent who offers her comfort, companionship and, as they grow closer and when it is revealed that Dee's husband is violent, racist and abusive, the possibility of a new and brighter future. As the negotiations proceed, Dee's daughter returns from the mainland to help field phone calls from the media and visits from nosy neighbors and Dee herself, wafted into a semi-dream world through sleeping pills and pain pills, becomes ambivalent about herself, her marriage, and her desires for the outcome of the hostage situation.

Kumu Kahua artistic director, Harry Wong III will direct the production, with set design by Molly McKenna, light design by Abel Dulles-Coelho, costume design by Dusty Behner, sound design by Stu Hirayama, and props are by Jason Ellinwood, who will also serve as assistant director and stage manager. The cast features Kumu veterans Denise Aiko-Chinen, Jason Kanda, Will Kahele, Nani Morita, and Jodi A. Yamada, along with Kumu newcomers Mish Raboteau and Tyler Tanabe.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm:
May 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31
June 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 2008

Sundays 2pm:
May 18, 25
June 1, 8, *15, 2008

*American Sign Language Interpretation performance



36TH SEASON (2006 - 2007)


Mahalo Las Vegas


by Edward Sakamoto

August 25 - September 29, 2006



Our season opens with Mahalo Las Vegas by Edward Sakamoto. Wally Fukuda left Hawaii and is living happily ever after in Vegas until circumstances shift and new variables are introduced. Wally's son and daughter-in-law have moved out of his home, replaced by California Harry, a luckless gambler who is hiding out from his creditors. Wally's daughter and her husband visit from Hawaii, bringing some surprises. And, a reluctant Wally and Harry are pursued by two tenacious women, one the widow of a mob boss. Sakamoto's Aloha Las Vegas, which precedes the action of this play and deals with Wally's decision to sell his house in Honolulu and make the move to Vegas, will be performed as benefit performances for Kumu Kahua.


Thursday & Saturday 8pm: August 24, 26, 31, September 2, 7, 9, 14, 16, 21, 23

Sundays 2pm: August 27, September 3, 10, 17, 24, 2006

  • Aloha Las Vegas (not a part of the season package, but available to subscribers prior to public sale):

  • Friday 8pm: August 25, September 1, 8, 22, 29

  • Saturday 2pm: August 26, September 2, 9, 16, 23, 2006



Who the Fil-Am I?


By Troy Apostol

November 9 - december 10, 2006


In Troy Apostol's Who the Fil-Am I?, three Filipino-Hawaiians from Hawai`i, all in their mid-twenties, take a trip to the Philippines. Malcom has been there before, as an Ivy League college student teaching English to high school kids, and he's the only one of the three who speaks Tagalog. Ronald, his cousin, is a surfer without much desire to experience the world outside of Hawai`i until this trip. Tomas, Ronald's best friend, appears at first to be little more than a jive-talking, beer-guzzling party animal. Personalities clash and tempers flare as the priorities of the trip are heatedly debated and all three struggle to come to grips with their ancestry and their multi-ethnic, multi-cultural identities. Their odyssey gives theatergoers a taste of life in the Philippines as the trio travels from Manila and Makati to Baguio and the sacred caves of Sagada, and from a descent into the underworld to a new level of enlightenment and understanding of themselves and one another. This play was originally produced at Leeward Community College.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: November 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 24, 25, 30, December 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 2006

Sundays 2pm: November 12, 19, 26, December 3, 10, 2006

ADVISORY: Adult situations and language.



Living Pidgin


by Lee Tonouchi

January 11 - February 11, 2007


For Living Pidgin, Lee Tonouchi, the author of Da Kine Dictionary and the short-story collection Da Word, who was dubbed "Da Pidgin Guerilla" by an English teacher at U.H. Manoa, has collected short plays and theatrical vignettes that showcase his facility with Pidgin, his sense of humor, and his love of life in the islands. The show will play at Kumu Kahua from January 11 through February 11. This play contains strong use of Hawaiian Creole English and Pidgin English situations.

"How Fo Be Local in 5 Easy Steps" features a flirtatious, egotistical documentary filmmaker whose actors have a reality script of their own. "7 Deadly Local Sins" reveals the humorous character flaws of Hawai`i's Local society, as told by an aloha shirt-wearing, downtown businessman walking down Fort Street Mall. "Significant Moments in da Life of Oriental Faddah and Son" is a comic, yet heartfelt monologue about the strained relationship between a son and his Oriental Faddah. "Dey Say if You Talk Pidgin You No Can" collects advice students have received over the years on how speaking Pidgin will limit them in life. "Hawaiian Hero for Hire" introduces the world to Hawaiian Man and his superhero sidekick Haole Boy, as they struggle to find relevance for Hawaiian culture in today's fast-paced, cash-money world. "Pijin Wawrz" takes place in Future Hawai`i, where Pidgin is outlawed and only the Pidgin Rebels can take on the impossible mission of rescuing the rumored lost Pidgin archives.

Kumu Kahua Artistic Director Harry Wong will direct the production, with set design by Dean Bellen, costume design by Alvin Chan, and sound design by Stu Hirayama. The cast features Kumu veterans Pukaua Ah-Nee, Daniel Kalahele, Kristen Nonaka, D. Tafa`i Silipa and Darryl Tsutsui. Making their Kumu debuts are Jaeves Iha, Julia Nakamoto, and Jeremy Wagner.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: January 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, February 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 2007

Sundays 2pm: January 14, 21, 28, February 11*, 2007

* American Sign Language Interpretation



Kāmau


By Alani Apio

March 15 - April 15, 2007


Alani Apio's Kāmau, first produced by Kumu Kahua for its 1994 summer tour of the Islands, was described by Honolulu Advertisertheater critic Joseph Rozmiarek as a moving and powerful piece on the nature of personal and cultural compromise. The story centers around Alika, a Hawaiian man who works as a guide for a local tour company to support his adopted family. His employer offers Alika a promotion, at the same time informing him that the company has purchased and plans to build a hotel on the oceanfront land where Alika's family has lived and fished for generations. Weighed down with responsibilities and confused by alcohol, Alika struggles with his conscience as he considers his alternatives. No pat answers or one-dimensional characters are offered in Kāmau (which means to persevere) as the playwright explores the complex interrelationships, moral ambiguities, and harsh realities of life in contemporary Hawaii.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: March 15, 16, 22, 23, 24, 29, 30, 31, April 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 2007

Sundays 2pm: March 18, 25, April 1, 15, 2007



Teacher, Teacher


by Anthony Michael Oliver

May 17 - June 17, 2007


In Teacher, Teacher by Anthony Michael Oliver, Sharon Kido is a forty-year-old, unmarried college English teacher who, as she describes it, loses her cool on the last day of class and scolds her students for being drifters, dreamers, and slobs who can't speak, dress, or even walk properly, and have no manners, respect, goals, or plans. Gavin, one of her students, takes her words to heart and later asks her to help him change by giving him lessons over the summer. When the local-style Pygmalion process begins, the teacher-student relationship is maintained. But, as the weeks go by, the situation changes. Playwright Anthony Michael Oliver was the winner of the 2002 Kumu Kahua Theatre and University of Hawaii at Mānoa Playwriting Contest's Hawai`i Prize for his play Theme Park.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8pm: May 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 31, June 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 14, 15, 16, 2007

Sundays 2pm: May 20, 27, June 3, 10, 17, 2007



35TH SEASON (2005 - 2006)


Tea


By Velina Hasu

August 25 - September 24, 2005


The season opens with Tea by Velina Hasu Houston. Four Japanese women, all post-World War II immigrants with American servicemen husbands, meet at the home of a fifth, who has committed suicide. They clean up the house, drink tea together, and come to know each other and the dead woman, who haunts the play as a restless spirit. "Without being tough, they are strong," says playwright Houston. "Without being weak, they are gentle. Without being aggressive, they are survivors." First produced by Kumu in 1990, this new production of Tea opens in August 2005.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8 pm: August 25, 26, 27; September 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 17, 22, 23, 24, 2005

Sunday 2 pm, August 28, September 4, 11, 18, 25, 2005



Age Sex Location


By Dennis Carroll

October 27 - November 27, 2005


In Dennis Carroll's Age Sex Location, four generations of a local family confront the complexities and perils of cyberspace. When a computer is brought home to help daughter Janine with her job, everyone wants to log on. But the family's existing problems--financial troubles, Alzheimers, and parent-child conflict--only get more intense in the world of Internet gambling and online chat-room dating. A four-person Compuchorus calls out Internet jargon, pop-up advertising, and Instant Messages, as the computer becomes a complex and sinister character. A world premiere, Age Sex Location opens in October 2005.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8 pm: October 27, 28, 29; November 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 17, 18, 19, 25, 26, 2005

Sunday 2 pm: October 30; November 6, 13, 20, 27, 2005



Ulua: The Musical


By Lee Cataluna

January 12 - February 12, 2006


With book and lyrics by Lee Cataluna and music by Sean T. C. O'Malley, Ulua: The Musical deals with life, love, and fishing on Maui. Local boy Kayden Asiu leaves his job, his Soloflex, and his fiancee Lylas on O`ahu to explore life's options on Maui. Butchie and Clyson, two co-workers, introduce him to the joys of all-night ulua fishing. But Lylas follows Kayden to Maui, Butchie's fiancee gets upset, and eventually the women follow their men to the ulua, and the sea. First staged by Kumu in 1999, this musical comedy comes to the intimate KKT stage for the first time. Ulua: The Musical opens in January 2006.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8 pm: January 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 26, 27, 28; February 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 2006

Sunday 2 pm: January 15, 22, 29; February 12, 2006



The Songmaker’s Chair


By Albert Wendt

March 16 - April 15, 2006


In the words of its playwright Albert Wendt,The Songmaker's Chair "introduces audiences to the lives of those courageous migrant families who have made Auckland and Aotearoa their home." A story of conflict, continuity, and change in three generations of an extended Samoan family, this play enjoyed sold-out houses during its recent world premiere productions in New Zealand. The first full-length play by one of the foremost Pacific novelists and essayists, The Songmaker's Chair opens in March 2006.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8 pm: March 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25, 30, 31; April 1, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 2006

Sunday 2 pm: March 19, 26; April 2, 9, 2006



Another Heaven


by eric anderson

May 18 - June 18, 2006


Based on a true story, Eric Anderson's Another Heaven tells a tale of racial conflict, ambition, and greed in late nineteenth-century Hawai`i. Katsu Goto, owner of a general store, tries to help the Japanese plantation workers stand up for their rights against their foreman and the plantation owner. Violence ensues, and an investigator from Honolulu comes looking for evidence that others would rather keep buried. This historical drama won the Kumu Kahua Playwriting Competition's Hawaii Prize in 2001.


Thursday, Friday & Saturday 8 pm: May 18, 19, 20, 25, 26 27; June 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 2006

Sunday 2 pm: May 21, 28; June 4, 11, 18, 2006



34TH SEASON (2004 - 2005)




33RD SEASON (2003 - 2004)


32nd SEASON (2002 - 2003)


31st SEASON (2001 - 2002)